The Anachronistic Futurist
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Posted on 6th Feb at 5:03 PM, with 2 notes


Seven record players. While one of them continuously plays the LP Programme Radio that was composed with Rainier Lericolais and Christel Brunet (reference OS.000) the six other turntables are switched on randomly and we can hear the sudden jumps and clicks of purposely scratched 45’s of light variety music.

This audio installation is … well I wish I could have seen it in person. It’s fascinating. 


Posted on 4th Feb at 4:00 PM, with 1 note

I have a ton of manual focus, K-Mount lenses (and film cameras). The prospect of a mirrorless (and therefore compact) digital camera that can make use of those lenses is terribly exciting. 

Plus that 40mm lens is gorgeous.

Thoughts?  

Posted on 4th Feb at 3:01 PM, with 43 notes
It’s no secret that people studied under, and often imitated, Leonardo Da Vinci. In this case, though, there is something more significant going on. 
As far as the major art historians can tell, this newly discovered ‘copy’ of the Mona Lisa was painted at the same time as the original by one of Leonardo’s star pupils. At this point the identity of the hand in question is still up in the air, but *top men* are working round the clock to figure out who painted this 500 year old painting. 
It’s interesting to me to see how much of a difference not being considered one of the most important paintings of all time has on preservation efforts. This ‘copy’ is as old as the original. It hasn’t really been well cared for (for 200+ years most of the painting was covered in black lacquer) but, thanks to the fact that it wasn’t a terribly important painting, it hasn’t been ruined by state-of-the-art-in-1850 ‘restoration’ techniques. Because no one was horrified at the thought of losing this painting we haven’t lost it. 
In the beginning, they both had eyebrows; they both had a twinkle in their eyes. In all likelihood, they both had on red dresses. Think about that. 
Look at the two of them side by side. If you didn’t know anything else about the works, at a distance at least, which would you consider to be superior?  
Read more from The Art Newspaper and Time Magazine. 

It’s no secret that people studied under, and often imitated, Leonardo Da Vinci. In this case, though, there is something more significant going on. 

As far as the major art historians can tell, this newly discovered ‘copy’ of the Mona Lisa was painted at the same time as the original by one of Leonardo’s star pupils. At this point the identity of the hand in question is still up in the air, but *top men* are working round the clock to figure out who painted this 500 year old painting. 

It’s interesting to me to see how much of a difference not being considered one of the most important paintings of all time has on preservation efforts. This ‘copy’ is as old as the original. It hasn’t really been well cared for (for 200+ years most of the painting was covered in black lacquer) but, thanks to the fact that it wasn’t a terribly important painting, it hasn’t been ruined by state-of-the-art-in-1850 ‘restoration’ techniques. Because no one was horrified at the thought of losing this painting we haven’t lost it.

In the beginning, they both had eyebrows; they both had a twinkle in their eyes. In all likelihood, they both had on red dresses. Think about that. 

Look at the two of them side by side. If you didn’t know anything else about the works, at a distance at least, which would you consider to be superior?  

Read more from The Art Newspaper and Time Magazine

Posted on 19th Dec at 9:37 PM, with 16 notes
"Don’t ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive, and go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive."

Howard Thurman | The values-driven startup  (via courtenaybird)

Don’t spend your life doing things you don’t enjoy. Thrive. 

My goal, my one goal in life, is to leave this world a far different place than it would have been without me. I light up, I come alive, when I can change the world.  

Posted on 19th Dec at 10:37 AM, with 96 notes
5 Books You Can’t Download

scribnerbooks:

       

Because they’re not available as an e-book, and won’t be, for the foreseeable future.

[via]

When it comes to content that isn’t legally available digitally my mantra is the same as it is with any other out of print media: if you won’t let me buy it, I won’t feel bad about downloading it for free. 

I already own physical copies of all of these books. That means that I am entitled to read them however I please, right? Why shouldn’t I head over to #bookz or demonoid and grab a copy that someone else (with a kind soul) has taken the time to digitize.  

Is it theft for me to download a digital copy of a book for which I own a physical copy? 

(Is it theft for me to download a copy of a computer game that has been out of print for 25 years? Is it theft for me to download a vinyl rip of an LP or a single that was never released on CD? Should it be?)  

Posted on 19th Dec at 12:04 AM, with 54 notes

whisperoftheshot:

si-jones:

Lumus is offering a pair of light, wearable glasses that will display 1280 x 720 HD video and allow you to interact with the world via augmented reality.

Light pumps in the earpieces send and refract light down the lens. This moves the electronics away from the eyes, offering a lighter, more streamlined experience. The lenses are transparent and display an apparent 87-inch screen about ten feet away. Because each eye display works independently, you can also view 3D video.

these are awesome.

Internet of things, here we come. 

Posted on 16th Dec at 4:49 PM, with 318 notes
infoneer-pulse:

via Dilbert

Sometimes Apple makes me happy. 
View high resolution

infoneer-pulse:

via Dilbert

Sometimes Apple makes me happy. 

Posted on 16th Dec at 2:11 PM, with 32 notes
On Internet Photography
The Hundreds: How do you think the Internet has changed the way people take pictures?
Alex Martinez: It’s the ideal way to share photos but a horrible way to experience them. The pendulum always swings to the extremes first, and I think we are experiencing that now with the internet and photography. With independent books and zines on the rise again I kind of feel a balancing out happening.
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Such an interesting point. Books and magazines aren't dying, they aren't going all digital, they are changing. They are becoming personal and customized. Unique is the name of the game, how long will it take big companies to catch up to that.
Print on demand technologies mean that I can have books and magazines that are completely unique to me, one of a kind, and still affordable.
Why has no one embraced that? Copyright laws are one problem, software is another. In the publishing world, the ability of our hardware far outstrips the ability of our software. Managing huge amounts of data (and the metadata and copyright information that goes along with it) isn't an easy task. Once it's been accomplished, turning that data into physical goods should be easy as pie.
I'd love to do it, but I can't do it alone.
Who wants to help? (Hell, who wants to beat me to it?)
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